Tag Archives: college

As a Christian, I’m opposed to parents homeschooling their kids or sending them to Christian school. I graduated 5 years ago and in that time I’ve noticed the Christians who went to Public School are well rounded and educated when it comes to interacting with non-Christians. The homeschoolers tend to be more verbally abusive and don’t know how to have rational conversations. And the kids who when to Christian schools are more likely to be partiers and/or nonbelievers. That’s my two cents.

peterdwebb:

classically-depunk:

blackandgoldkeywork:

classically-depunk:

peterdwebb:

Crazy homeschoolers. Don’t know how to talk to people. They probably don’t even know what a tumblr is. Rock-polishing tumblr maybe. 

I disagree. This follows the fallacy of generalization. As a home-schooler, my parents expanded my worldviews and taught me proper maturity in conservation and manners. While each of us in society is undeniable human and prone to social faux pas, to generalize ALL home-schoolers under the stereotype of being social inept or unfit is illogical and lends the impression of bigotry of bias.

While I am not harboring any dislike for the holder of this opinion, it seems this person is either misinformed or has not encountered home-schoolers of a different social level.

Again, as a home-schooler, I can assure the holder of this opinion that not ALL home-schoolers fall under the category you have encountered. Where I live, those who attended public school tend to display anti-social inclinations and destructive habits as opposed to home-schoolers in our region.

Dude, you obviously don’t get how many home schoolers and Christian school kids I grew up with within my church.

Most of the homeschoolers I KNOW PERSONALLY were not able to have a conversation with someone of differing opinions until they got a few years into college, assuming they didn’t become atheists or only go to school for seminary. They don’t have this sort of balance between knowing when the time to start an argument is and let things go, knowing that they are a better witness by not arguing. Also most of them judge the other Christians they knew who consumed alcohol or smoked, even when they were old enough to do so.

And I can guarantee you that at least half of all the kids I knew who went to Christian school were drinking, smoking, and doing drugs in high school (the first two obviously being okay when you’re of finally age for both). The rest were either oddly well adjusted or ended up like the home school kids I knew.

All I was trying to say is that if you want your kid to be a Christian, you can’t take away all of the things that put pressure on what they believe, otherwise, many of them will have their beliefs collapse in an instant when they enter “the real world”. They should grow up understanding that everyone is different and being able to interact with others and accept or look past their differences, something I don’t see a lot of homeschooled kids being able to do.

But that’s in my personal experience with the kids I personally knew. I’m not misinformed. 

(Also, glad to see passive aggression isn’t lost on the Christians on this site. It’s nice to know that I’m wrong and obviously don’t know anything because you assume that all homeschoolers had the same experience you did)

I did not say you were wrong. Please do not mistake my words. I ask for your forgiveness if this somehow offended you.

My apologies, perhaps I did not make myself clear. I did not say ALL home-schoolers. Yes, while your experience only accounts for your demographic area, it does not entail every home-schooler alive. While in home-schooled events, many of these young people did display equally vulgar behavior.

Being home-school in the right experience does not mean you are sheltered.

I grew up in poverty, faced racial (being half Hispanic/Honduran Lenca) and social discrimination, along with severe bullying daily due to a congential health condition which left my appearance odd. I have two disabled siblings whom I advocate for their rights.I grew up to the sounds of police busting druggies next door, and shootouts where our windows were cracked by bullets. While most kids enjoyed nice houses with green lawns, I grew up in the rough parts where the middle-class would never venture.

I also volunteer at the local library (9 years so far) and the hospital, as well being a member of Big Brother, Big Sister. I also head the local reading club at the library and the writer’s workshop for middle-schoolers at the United Way in our town.

I do apologize if my contestment to your statement impressed you as harsh, or as you put, “passive-aggressive”. But please know I did not grow up sheltered. I grew up among crime- druggies, prostitutes, and local police who were no better than thugs. I grew up in a veritable slum. I grew up growing up fast and learning adult skill and social skills for my own survival and my family’s. I grew up with grandparents who were vertiable sociopaths and was compelled to be estranged from them for my own safety.

I worked jobs as a library clerk, baker and grammar tutor in my life. I have been chosen to speak at engagements for the benefit of our local library and United Way.

It does not appears I am under this classification, neither have several of my fellow colleagues. Two have gone on to become social workers, and one a Civil Rights Attorney.

I do not state these facts to display any arrogance or self-vindication- merely a presentation of facts to show that generalization is harmful and creates bias in our society. Given our tensely divided social tone of modern society, we must seek way to defuse this method of generalization.

As the Algonquin saying goes, “If a dog bites your hand,do you hate and kill all dogs?”

In essence, because one had encountered one demograph in your area (or where you encountered these people), one cannot dismiss collectively an entire classification of people. That in itself is a fallacy which harbors negative results.

Please accept my most sincerest apologies. I did not intend to sound belligerent by any means. From our initial encounter, you appear an astute person of character and firm conviction. Likewise, your blog is extremely insightful. God bless you in all your endeavours.

#notallhomeschoolers

Whoa, whoa, whoa… I am a homeschool graduate who is one year through college, and I can honestly say that as a homeschooler and graduate of a high-school skills center, the college experience has been the worst education experiences I’ve had so far. No one is perfect, and kids who have attended public school all their lives usually have problems of their own due to that environment. Don’t go bashing homeschooling.

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As a Christian, I’m opposed to parents homeschooling their kids or sending them to Christian school. I graduated 5 years ago and in that time I’ve noticed the Christians who went to Public School are well rounded and educated when it comes to interacting with non-Christians. The homeschoolers tend to be more verbally abusive and don’t know how to have rational conversations. And the kids who when to Christian schools are more likely to be partiers and/or nonbelievers. That’s my two cents.

peterdwebb:

classically-depunk:

blackandgoldkeywork:

classically-depunk:

peterdwebb:

Crazy homeschoolers. Don’t know how to talk to people. They probably don’t even know what a tumblr is. Rock-polishing tumblr maybe. 

I disagree. This follows the fallacy of generalization. As a home-schooler, my parents expanded my worldviews and taught me proper maturity in conservation and manners. While each of us in society is undeniable human and prone to social faux pas, to generalize ALL home-schoolers under the stereotype of being social inept or unfit is illogical and lends the impression of bigotry of bias.

While I am not harboring any dislike for the holder of this opinion, it seems this person is either misinformed or has not encountered home-schoolers of a different social level.

Again, as a home-schooler, I can assure the holder of this opinion that not ALL home-schoolers fall under the category you have encountered. Where I live, those who attended public school tend to display anti-social inclinations and destructive habits as opposed to home-schoolers in our region.

Dude, you obviously don’t get how many home schoolers and Christian school kids I grew up with within my church.

Most of the homeschoolers I KNOW PERSONALLY were not able to have a conversation with someone of differing opinions until they got a few years into college, assuming they didn’t become atheists or only go to school for seminary. They don’t have this sort of balance between knowing when the time to start an argument is and let things go, knowing that they are a better witness by not arguing. Also most of them judge the other Christians they knew who consumed alcohol or smoked, even when they were old enough to do so.

And I can guarantee you that at least half of all the kids I knew who went to Christian school were drinking, smoking, and doing drugs in high school (the first two obviously being okay when you’re of finally age for both). The rest were either oddly well adjusted or ended up like the home school kids I knew.

All I was trying to say is that if you want your kid to be a Christian, you can’t take away all of the things that put pressure on what they believe, otherwise, many of them will have their beliefs collapse in an instant when they enter “the real world”. They should grow up understanding that everyone is different and being able to interact with others and accept or look past their differences, something I don’t see a lot of homeschooled kids being able to do.

But that’s in my personal experience with the kids I personally knew. I’m not misinformed. 

(Also, glad to see passive aggression isn’t lost on the Christians on this site. It’s nice to know that I’m wrong and obviously don’t know anything because you assume that all homeschoolers had the same experience you did)

I did not say you were wrong. Please do not mistake my words. I ask for your forgiveness if this somehow offended you.

My apologies, perhaps I did not make myself clear. I did not say ALL home-schoolers. Yes, while your experience only accounts for your demographic area, it does not entail every home-schooler alive. While in home-schooled events, many of these young people did display equally vulgar behavior.

Being home-school in the right experience does not mean you are sheltered.

I grew up in poverty, faced racial (being half Hispanic/Honduran Lenca) and social discrimination, along with severe bullying daily due to a congential health condition which left my appearance odd. I have two disabled siblings whom I advocate for their rights.I grew up to the sounds of police busting druggies next door, and shootouts where our windows were cracked by bullets. While most kids enjoyed nice houses with green lawns, I grew up in the rough parts where the middle-class would never venture.

I also volunteer at the local library (9 years so far) and the hospital, as well being a member of Big Brother, Big Sister. I also head the local reading club at the library and the writer’s workshop for middle-schoolers at the United Way in our town.

I do apologize if my contestment to your statement impressed you as harsh, or as you put, “passive-aggressive”. But please know I did not grow up sheltered. I grew up among crime- druggies, prostitutes, and local police who were no better than thugs. I grew up in a veritable slum. I grew up growing up fast and learning adult skill and social skills for my own survival and my family’s. I grew up with grandparents who were vertiable sociopaths and was compelled to be estranged from them for my own safety.

I worked jobs as a library clerk, baker and grammar tutor in my life. I have been chosen to speak at engagements for the benefit of our local library and United Way.

It does not appears I am under this classification, neither have several of my fellow colleagues. Two have gone on to become social workers, and one a Civil Rights Attorney.

I do not state these facts to display any arrogance or self-vindication- merely a presentation of facts to show that generalization is harmful and creates bias in our society. Given our tensely divided social tone of modern society, we must seek way to defuse this method of generalization.

As the Algonquin saying goes, “If a dog bites your hand,do you hate and kill all dogs?”

In essence, because one had encountered one demograph in your area (or where you encountered these people), one cannot dismiss collectively an entire classification of people. That in itself is a fallacy which harbors negative results.

Please accept my most sincerest apologies. I did not intend to sound belligerent by any means. From our initial encounter, you appear an astute person of character and firm conviction. Likewise, your blog is extremely insightful. God bless you in all your endeavours.

#notallhomeschoolers

Whoa, whoa, whoa… I am a homeschool graduate who is one year through college, and I can honestly say that as a homeschooler and graduate of a high-school skills center, the college experience has been the worst education experiences I’ve had so far. No one is perfect, and kids who have attended public school all their lives usually have problems of their own due to that environment. Don’t go bashing homeschooling.

Live Blog!

Late-night push to knock out a hellish paper about a specific cultural group and how their portrayal in American mass media impacts them. My subject: white men. Because fuck English professors’ expectations. I think I’m just going to live-blog when I get super angry or something like that. Don’t mind me. 

Hey, everyone! So, I’m doing a thing for my statistics class where I need to gather responses from at least 30 people on both of the following 2 questions. If you feel like taking a quick moment to respond, that would be awesome! Thanks!

Question 1: How many hours of sleep do you get on average each night? (Rounded to the nearest half-hour)

Question 2: How many cups of coffee do you drink on average each day? (Rounded to the nearest cup)